The Democrats on the House Financial Services Committee are pushing their proposed package of bills aimed at responding to the coronavirus (“COVID-19”) pandemic. This time around, they are supporting the bill that would place a moratorium on debt collection activities for the duration of the pandemic.

A May 5 release from the Democrats on the

Earlier this month, the United States District Court for the Western District of Texas denied a student loan servicer’s motion for judgment on the pleadings, finding that it was not entitled to absolute immunity under the Eleventh Amendment of the United States Constitution for alleged violations of the Fair Credit Reporting Act.

In May 2018,

On May 14, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau reached an $18 million settlement with mortgage lender Monster Loans (a/k/a Chou Team Realty LLC) and several individual, related entities to resolve allegations that they impermissibly and duplicitously obtained credit reports for their associated student loan debt-relief companies, which, in turn, used the consumer reports to deceptively

Can consumers sue the federal government and its agencies for violating the Fair Credit Reporting Act? As we previously have observed, the answer varies by circuit and even by district, but the Supreme Court of the United States has just officially declined to wade into the debate—at least for now.

In

The status of the Louisiana Public Service Commission’s (“Commission”) potential enforcement of the available emergency measures pursuant to the Do Not Call General Order (Docket No. R_29617, decided Oct. 11, 2006) (“DNC Order”) has been unclear. While these emergency measures generally have been imposed during prior emergencies, they presently remain unimplemented despite Governor John Bel

On April 22, the Supreme Court of Appeals of West Virginia issued another amended emergency order extending court deadlines. The order can be found here. The Court’s new order delays all court deadlines for matters scheduled to occur during the emergency period from March 23, 2020 to May 15, 2020 until May 18, 2020.

Senators Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) and Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) last week released a proposal for new consumer protection measures that they claim are critical to helping Americans weather the coronavirus (“COVID-19”) pandemic. Noting that the stimulus payments provided by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (“CARES Act”) may not be enough to cover basic

Multiple states have come together to enact initiatives aimed at prohibiting private student loan servicers from certain activities that will remain in place during the coronavirus (“COVID-19”) pandemic. The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (“CARES Act”) did not address private student loans that are not federally-backed. Recently, New York worked out an agreement

Earlier this week, the American Council on Education (“ACE”) wrote a letter to Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) requesting extended student loan relief on behalf of more than 30 higher education organizations. In the letter, which focuses on the likely long-term economic impact of the coronavirus (“COVID-19”)

As New York considers reopening the State’s economy after a months-long shutdown, legislators recently reached an agreement with private student loan servicers to provide financial relief to borrowers. Spearheaded by the New York State Department of Financial Services (“DFS”), the agreement supplements the federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (“CARES Act”), by extending