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Jeremy focuses his practice on federal and state lending and consumer practices laws, with emphasis on the interplay between federal and state laws, joint ventures between banks and nonbank financial services providers, the development and documentation of new financial services products (especially products designed to serve the needs of unbanked and under-banked consumers), bank overdraft practices and disclosures, geographic expansion initiatives, and compliance with federal and state consumer protection laws, including statutes prohibiting unfair, deceptive and abusive acts and practices (UDAAP); usury laws; the Truth in Lending Act (TILA); the Electronic Funds Transfer Act; E-SIGN; the Equal Credit Opportunity Act; and the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA).

As discussed here, on November 18, the Biden administration filed an application with the U.S. Supreme Court to vacate the Eighth Circuit injunction temporarily pausing the administration’s student loan forgiveness program. In its application, the administration requested that the Court either vacate the injunction, or, in the alternative, to construe the application as a

As discussed here, last month, the Eighth Circuit granted an emergency motion by Republican officials in six states to temporarily pause the Biden administration’s student loan forgiveness program while they appeal the dismissal of their challenge by a Missouri federal judge, who found that they do not have standing to sue. On November 18

As discussed here, on October 19, a three-judge panel of the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals held that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) funding mechanism violates the appropriations clause because the CFPB does not receive its funding from annual congressional appropriations like most executive agencies, but instead receives funding directly from the Federal

Unsurprisingly, defendants in two separate enforcements actions filed by the Consumer Financial Protection Agency (CFPB) have cited the Fifth Circuit’s recent decision in Community Financial Services Association of America, Ltd. v. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau as a basis for having their actions dismissed. As we discussed here, earlier this month, the Fifth Circuit held

In a major decision released October 19, a three-judge panel of the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals found the funding mechanism for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB or Bureau) to be unconstitutional. Specifically, the court in Community Financial Services Association of America, Ltd. v. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau held the CFPB’s funding violates the

As we previously posted here, in March, Utah enacted its Commercial Financing Registration and Disclosure Act (CFRDA), requiring commercial financing providers to register with the Utah Department of Financial Institutions (DFI). The process requires registering with the Nationwide Multistate Licensing System and Registry (NMLS), providing certain information about the provider, and disclosing information about

As we previously posted here, in March, Utah enacted its Commercial Financing Registration and Disclosure Act (CFRDA), requiring commercial financing providers to register with the Utah Department of Financial Institutions (DFI). The process requires registering with the Nationwide Multistate Licensing System and Registry (NMLS), providing certain information about the provider, and disclosing information about

Wednesday, August 31 • 2:30 – 3:30 p.m. ET

Arbitration agreements continue to be a pressing issue in consumer-facing agreements. The United States Supreme Court recently issued several important decisions impacting how consumer arbitration agreements will be interpreted and enforced by the courts, including in the important arena of Private Attorneys General Act (PAGA) actions.

In a keynote address at the Consumer Federation of America’s 2022 Consumer Assembly, CFPB Deputy Director Zixta Martinez squarely took aim at “rent-a-bank schemes” in some of the first (if not the first) such comments by a senior CFPB official. Historically, the CFPB has confined itself to “true lender” litigation against participants in high-rate