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What CCPA Means to Security Leaders

Troutman Sanders attorney, Sadia Mirza was interviewed on the Impact of Emerging Privacy Legislation by ISMG.

Below are a few of Sadia’s comments from the interview:

“2018 was a huge year for privacy,” Mirza says. “It’s important to follow what’s going on in California right now because it’s going

On July 24, 2019, and for the second time this year, Troutman Sanders attorneys, Maryia Jones and Stephen Steinlight, will lead a webinar by Lorman Educational Services entitled, “Collection Disputes: A Good Defense Is the Best Offense.”

The credit and collection industry remain under an increased scrutiny from regulators and a target of

Two Troutman Sanders LLP attorneys recently published an article in a national publication discussing how to avoid risks in electronic delivery of insurance documents with an E-SIGN compliance strategy.

Alan Wingfield and Michael Huggins co-authored an article Avoid Pitfalls in Electronic Delivery of Documents with an E-SIGN Compliance Strategy in the American Bar Association Journal.

A fight over a receipt for chocolate could end up in the Supreme Court. The Eleventh Circuit affirmed a $6.3 million settlement between Godiva Chocolatier, Inc. and a class of plaintiffs who alleged that Godiva violated the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act by printing too many digits of the plaintiffs’ credit cards on their

Earlier this week, the Fourth Circuit struck down a provision of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (“TCPA”) that exempted government-backed debts from the statute’s prohibition on automated calls to cellular telephones. According to the Court in American Association of Political Consultants, Inc., et al v. FCC, the debt-collection exemption does not pass strict scrutiny

The United States Supreme Court ruled yesterday that arbitration agreements must explicitly authorize class arbitration in order for the process to be invoked by one of the parties. The decision overturns a Ninth Circuit ruling that permitted an employee’s arbitration to move forward on a class basis.

Background

In Varela v. Lamps Plus, Inc.,

On April 16, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit ruled that the definition of “conviction” under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), 15 U.S.C. 1681, et seq, should be interpreted under federal law, not the law of the state where the criminal record is generated. See Aldaco v. RentGrow, Inc.,

Federal and state laws impose requirements for delivering documents electronically to consumers, including with respect to insurers, agents, and brokers. The federal Electronic Records and Signatures in Commerce Act (commonly referred to as “E-SIGN”) requires a consumer’s informed, affirmative consent to receive the documents electronically. But states may “reverse-preempt” E-SIGN by adopting the Uniform Electronic

Author Stephen R. Covey has written, “Management is efficiency in climbing the ladder of success; leadership determines whether the ladder is leaning against the right wall.”[1] With the first quarter in full swing, community banks are preparing proxy statements, finalizing annual meeting agendas, and marshaling items for board attention. Now is the perfect time for

A recent objection by the U.S. Department of Justice to a proposed class action settlement in Cowen v. Lenny & Larry’s Inc.[1] may be an indication that the DOJ will be scrutinizing future settlements for the benefits to the class members. The DOJ argued in its objection that the bulk of the benefit from the