Photo of Amy Pritchard Williams

Amy has deep and wide-ranging experience in representing financial institutions in government enforcement matters, qui tam False Claims Act cases, consumer class actions and bankruptcy proceedings. She is adept in defending and providing pragmatic advice for the successful resolution of complex, multifaceted matters.

On May 30, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously decided Cantero, reaffirming and elaborating on the Barnett Bank preemption standard, and remanding the case to the Second Circuit for further proceedings. Cantero addressed whether a New York law requiring the payment of at least 2% per annum interest on mortgage escrow deposits was preempted by federal law as to national banks. The Supreme Court held that the Second Circuit erred when it failed to apply the preemption standard articulated in Barnett Bank of Marion County, N.A. v. Nelson, which was incorporated by Congress into the Dodd-Frank Act. The Court rejected the lower court’s holding “that federal law preempts any state law that ‘purports to exercise control over a federally granted banking power,’ regardless of ‘the magnitude of its effects.’” The Court also rejected the approach argued by the petitioners, explaining it would “yank the preemption standard to the opposite extreme, and would preempt virtually no non-discriminatory state laws that apply to both state and national banks.”

Two important updates impacting compliance with the Truth in Lending Act (TILA) and Reg Z have just been announced.

The TILA Examination Procedures have been revised and updated to reflect four final rules that amend the qualified mortgage (QM) provisions of Regulation Z. The rules in question were issued by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

Join us on Tuesday, April 27 as a panel of Troutman Pepper class action litigators examine recent developments in class action litigation in 2021 and provide insights on what the future holds. The panel will dive into the major decisions that were rendered this past year and explore ways for class action practitioners and in-house

In early March, New York State Attorney General Letitia James and New York City Corporation Counsel John E. Johnson announced a $105 million settlement against a hedge fund manager for tax evasion. The New York authorities were alerted to the potential of fraud in October 2018 by a whistleblower lawsuit brought under New York’s False

2020 was a transformative year for the consumer financial services world. As we navigate an unprecedented volume of industry regulation, Troutman Pepper is uniquely positioned to help its clients find successful resolutions and stay ahead of the compliance curve.

In this report, we share developments in 2020 on consumer class actions, background screening, bankruptcy,

Speakers:

James Stevens, Partner, Troutman Sanders
Richard Eckman, Of Counsel, Pepper Hamilton
Amy Williams, Partner, Troutman Sanders
Maryia Jones, Associate, Troutman Sanders
Richard Zack, Partner, Pepper Hamilton
Callan Stein, Partner, Pepper Hamilton

Join Troutman Sanders and Pepper Hamilton for a webinar on Friday, May 8, 2020 at 1:00 p.m. EDT

As the coronavirus (“COVID-19”) crisis continues to lead the legal profession into uncharted waters, one issue remains less than clear: how service of process will be affected for both the parties who are being served, and the parties who are serving. There is no question that service of process is more difficult given the number

2019 was a transformative year for the consumer financial services world. As we navigate an unprecedented volume of industry regulation, Troutman Sanders is uniquely positioned to help its clients find successful resolutions and stay ahead of the compliance curve.

In this report, we share developments on consumer class actions, background screening, bankruptcy, consumer credit

On September 12, the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, in a precedential ruling, held that courts are not required to hold an in-person hearing prior to granting a government’s request to dismiss a qui tam whistleblower’s federal False Claims Act (“FCA”) or Delaware False Claims Act (“DFCA”) suit. However, the Court

The Federal Trade Commission has issued a Final Rule rescinding several Model Forms and Disclosures it had promulgated under the Fair Credit Reporting Act. The FTC determined these Model Forms and Disclosures were no longer necessary following the transfer of rulemaking authority associated with these forms to the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (“CFPB”) under the