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Mark Windham is an associate in the firm’s Consumer Financial Services practice, with a focus on Financial Services Litigation and consumer law compliance. Mark’s principal areas of practice include consumer law, business disputes and commercial litigation.

A consumer made charges on a credit card account, which she failed to pay as agreed. The creditor referred the account to a law firm, which served the consumer with a collection suit and obtained a default judgment for the balance. The law firm sent four post-judgment collection letters, demanding the $4,225.74 balance. In a

2021 was a transformative year for the consumer financial services world. As we navigate an unprecedented volume of industry regulation, Troutman Pepper is uniquely positioned to help its clients find successful resolutions and stay ahead of the curve.

In this report, we share developments on auto finance, background screening, bankruptcy, consumer class actions, consumer

The Department of Education (Department) has announced that individuals who have a total and permanent disability (TPD) will have their unpaid student loans automatically discharged without having to file any paperwork. The change will affect 323,000 borrowers and result in a discharge of more than $5.8 billion in unpaid loan balances.

Pursuant to regulations enacted

In Blackmon v. Ad Astra Recovery Services, an individual claiming to be Brittney Blackmon obtained a payday loan in her name and then never made a payment. The debt was subsequently assigned to defendant collection firm Ad Astra Recovery Services, Inc. (AARC). Years later, Blackmon contacted AARC by telephone to dispute the debt. Blackmon

The plaintiff, an individual consumer, filed a chapter 7 bankruptcy petition, including in his schedules a debt for past-due rent for a former apartment. The bankruptcy was a matter of public record and was listed on his credit reports. After the plaintiff obtained his bankruptcy discharge, the defendant debt collector sent the plaintiff two collection

Last week, attorneys general from 17 states wrote a letter to Democrat and Republican leaders in both houses of Congress, expressing support for Senate Resolution 46 and House Resolution 100, which call upon President Biden to use executive authority under the Higher Education Act to cancel up to $50,000 in federal student loan debt for

A recent decision by the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia underscores the significance of issues of proof when trying to enforce arbitration agreements. The case is Proctor v. First Premier Corp., No. 1:20-cv-02162-BAH, 2021 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 6502 (D.D.C. Jan. 13, 2021).

Plaintiff Charnita Proctor sued First Premier Corp. (FPC) for

In a new decision slated for publication, the Sixth Circuit weighed in on an issue under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA): whether a “benign language” exception exists to a flat prohibition of substantive information appearing on an envelope containing a letter from a debt collector. The Sixth Circuit took a strict reading of

In Paul v. Enhanced Recovery Company, the plaintiff received two letters from a debt collector concerning the same debt, about 40 days apart. The letters were identical, except for the dates and the amount of the settlement offers – the first contained an offer of $1,375.42, while the second offer was $1,277.17.

In addition

Plaintiff Joseph Degroot defaulted on a credit card debt, which was subsequently placed with a collection agency. The agency sent the plaintiff a collection letter stating that “interest and fees are no longer being added to your account,” which the plaintiff took to mean that the account had been charged off. The debt was then