Photo of Zachary A. Turk

Zach is an associate in the firm’s Consumer Financial Services Practice Group. Before joining the firm, he served as a judicial clerk to the Honorable Michael F. Urbanski in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Virginia. He was also a summer associate in the firm’s Richmond office.

We are pleased to share our annual review of regulatory and legal developments in the consumer financial services industry. With active federal and state legislatures, consumer financial services providers faced a challenging 2023. Courts across the country issued rulings that will have immediate and lasting impacts on the industry. Our team of more than 140 professionals has prepared this concise, yet thorough analysis of the most important issues and trends throughout our industry. We not only examined what happened in 2023, but also what to expect — and how to prepare — for the months ahead.

A U.S. District Court in the Western District of Wisconsin recently denied both the defendant and plaintiff’s summary judgment motions in a Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) case, holding that the reasonableness of the defendant’s investigation of the plaintiff’s identity theft claim was a triable issue.

A district court in the Western District of Washington held that the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) does not require a consumer reporting agency (CRA), as part of its investigative duties, to issue an opinion on the legal validity of a consumer’s debt. Through its holding, the court denied the plaintiff’s motion for reconsideration and

The Federal Reserve issued a press release announcing its plans for a July debut of FedNow, its service “to facilitate nationwide reach of instant payment services by financial institutions.” As previously discussed here, the FedNow service will provide individuals and businesses the ability to send and receive instant payments through the Federal Reserve’s

The Middle District of Florida rounded out 2022 by ruling in conformance with Eleventh Circuit precedent that plaintiffs must have a factual, rather than legal, dispute to bring suit against a credit furnisher under §1681s-2b of the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA).

In Belair v. Holiday Inn Club Vacations Inc., the plaintiffs contracted to