In this special episode, Brooke Conkle and Chris Capurso discuss a recently released circular from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). They are joined by special guest Caleb Rosenberg, who provides insights into the potential impacts this “quietly released” circular may have on the auto finance industry. Caleb brings a wealth of experience, including assisting businesses with secured and unsecured loan agreements, retail installment sales contracts, credit card agreements, and alternative finance agreements. He also helps clients navigate regulatory inquiries, particularly those concerning the application of state law to alternative financing products. While this marks the final episode of our five-part series on auto finance issues, stay tuned for more content. Be sure to listen until the end for a BIG announcement!

Today, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB or Bureau) released a report on the state of negative equity in auto lending. The CFPB says it found that financing negative equity creates increased risks for consumers, and states that the CFPB will be putting negative equity under scrutiny.

Today, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) announced that its so-called “Payday, Vehicle Title and Certain High-Cost Installment Loans” rule (Rule) will go into effect on March 30, 2025. While ostensibly aimed at higher-APR lending (e.g., loans with an APR above 36%), it also applies to most creditors, including banks, offering loans: (1) that are substantially repayable within 45 days or less; or (2) that have a bullet or balloon payment feature. It applies by its plain terms to a number of mainstream financial products and products marketed to high-net worth individuals, none of which the CFPB seems to have considered when promulgating the rule.

On May 28, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) released its annual report to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) detailing enforcement and educational activities undertaken in 2023. The report pertains to actions under the Truth in Lending Act (TILA) and Regulation Z, the Consumer Leasing Act (CLA) and Regulation M, and the Electronic Fund Transfer Act (EFTA) and Regulation E. Specifically, the report highlights FTC initiatives in areas such as automobile financing and leasing, electronic fund transfers, so-called junk fees, payday lending, and negative options.

A U.S. District Court for the District of Maryland recently denied summary judgment in a case under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA), finding that the defendant failed to show it received prior express written consent for telemarketing calls.

In this episode of The Consumer Finance Podcast, Chris Willis introduces the firm’s esteemed bank regulatory team. Featuring Kevin Petrasic, Matthew Bornfreund, Alexandra Barrage, and Helen Lee, the episode delves into the team’s extensive experience in bank regulation, supervisory and enforcement matters, fintech, payments, and more. Each team member shares their unique background, including significant government and in-house experience, and discusses how their combined knowledge enhances Troutman Pepper’s ability to comprehensively serve financial institution clients. The episode underscores the firm’s strategic goal to be a one-stop shop for all financial services legal needs.

Dear Mary,

We had a security incident a few weeks backs that luckily turned out to be nothing. I’ll tell you, tension was high around here while the investigation was ongoing because there was a possibility that it was going to be bad. The forensic firm (hired by our outside counsel) figured out that the incident resulted from a misconfiguration in our MFA. We fixed that and now I’m wondering whether we really need a forensic report given the limited impact. I am not sure I understand the need.

– Uncertain in Atlanta

On June 11, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB or Bureau) released a proposed rule amending Regulation V, which implements the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), concerning medical debt. The proposed rule would remove a regulatory exception that currently allows creditors to obtain and use information on medical debts for credit eligibility determinations. Additionally, the proposed rule would generally prohibit consumer reporting agencies (CRAs) from furnishing consumer reports containing medical debt information to creditors. Comments on the proposed rule are being accepted until August 12, 2024. The Bureau aims to finalize the rule by early 2025.

In this episode of FCRA Focus, host Dave Gettings and his colleague Courtney Hitchcock explore the complexities of the Fair Credit Billing Act (FCBA). With an increase in FCBA claims, including those from pro se litigants, it is essential for creditors to understand the procedural requirements and potential challenges. Courtney discusses the basics of the FCBA, common billing errors, and the steps creditors should take when faced with a claim. She also provides practical strategies for effectively handling FCBA disputes. Tune in for an informative discussion that will help you navigate FCBA claims with confidence.