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Chris represents clients in regulatory, civil, and criminal investigations and litigation. In his practice, Chris regularly employs his prior regulatory experience to benefit clients who are interacting with and being investigated by state attorneys general.

On June 7, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced a request for information (RFI) to gain additional insight into how it can optimize joint enforcement with state attorneys general (state AGs) to protect consumers from fraud. The announcement signals a growing trend of cooperation between the FTC and state AGs, which we have also seen between the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and the state regulators.

On November 7, Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey announced a $600,000 settlement with Oklahoma-based payment processor Global Holdings. Attorney General Healey claimed that Global Holdings violated the Massachusetts Unfair and Deceptive Practices Act by sending debt settlement company DMB Financial LLC (DMB) its fees before the federal Telemarketing Sales Rule permits debt settlement companies like

Please join Consumer Financial Services Partner Chris Willis and his colleagues Stefanie Jackman and Chris Carlson as they discuss the recent action by the Massachusetts attorney general (AG) involving automobile dealer pricing discrimination. After a Massachusetts-based automobile dealer allegedly engaged in discriminatory pricing toward Black and Hispanic automobile customers via additional charges for “add-on” products, the AG’s office acted. Listen as Chris, Stefanie, and Chris dive deeper into the case and what it could mean for automobile dealers in the future.

In response to the Fifth Circuit’s ruling in Community Financial Services Association of America, Ltd. v. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFSA) that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) funding mechanism is unconstitutional, West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey sent a letter on October 24th to the CFPB, calling its continued operations into question and foreshadowing potential state challenges to its actions. While some state AGs and financial regulators are likely to help offset any reduction in CFPB activity through their own investigations and coordination with the CFPB, the dark cloud of the CFSA opinion hangs over the agency.

Please join Troutman Pepper Partner Chris Willis and guests Troutman Pepper Associates Chris Carlson and Susan Nikdel as they discuss the multistate coalition of state attorneys general calling on many of the nation’s largest banks to eliminate overdraft fees. The conversation focuses on what was done, which state attorneys general participated, the current controversy surrounding overdraft fees, and several key takeaways for the industry going forward.

On January 13, a coalition of 39 state attorneys general — led by AGs from Pennsylvania, Washington, Illinois, Massachusetts, and California — reached a settlement with student loan servicer Navient over allegedly unfair, deceptive, and abusive student loan origination and servicing practices. The $1.8 billion settlement will undoubtedly draw eyes, but perhaps just as important

If you use the internet, you have probably encountered at least one of the scams con artists use to bilk victims. There’s “catfishing” and other online dating fraud, where scammers use fake identities to woo victims into sending money. There’s also “grandparent scams,” where typically elderly victims are tricked by those posing as his or

Bob Ferguson, the attorney general of Washington, has released his 2021 legislative agenda. The requested legislation includes a bill that would self-impose notice requirements to Washington tribes before initiating a project or program that would implicate tribal rights. The legislation “requires that the Attorney General obtain free, prior, and informed consent before initiating programs or

On January 5, Virginia Attorney General Mark R. Herring announced the creation of a new Office of Civil Rights, which will expand and replace the existing Division of Human Rights within the office of the attorney general. The new division is a prime example of state regulators’ expanded scrutiny of workplace activities occurring nationwide,