Credit Reporting & Data Brokers

Requiring an employee or consumer to submit any dispute to binding arbitration as a condition of employment or purchase of a product or service is commonly referred to as “forced arbitration.”  Many times, the employee or consumer is required to waive their right to sue or to participate in a class action lawsuit.  Critics argue

On February 26, the House Financial Services Committee held a hearing entitled “Who’s Keeping Score? Holding Credit Bureaus Accountable and Repairing a Broken System,” with the CEOs of the big three credit bureaus – TransUnion, Equifax, and Experian – testifying. The hearing was the first time the current CEOs of the major credit bureaus have

On February 25, the Federal Trade Commission and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau reauthorized their Memorandum of Understanding, or “MOU.”

The MOU, which governs the FTC’s and CFPB’s joint operations, focuses on five key areas of cooperation:

  • Joint law enforcement efforts – The agreement requires one agency to give notice to the other prior to

On February 7, 2019, AllianceOne Receivables Management, Inc. (“AllianceOne”), a debt collector, agreed to pay $2.2 million to settle a nationwide class action alleging violations of the Fair Credit Reporting Act (“FCRA”) for obtaining consumer reports on individuals with outstanding parking tickets without a permissible purpose.

The parties moved to approve the settlement after more

The Federal Reserve Board of Governors and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) issued a joint advisory making financial institutions aware of a recent change to the Fair Credit Reporting Act (“FCRA”) that provides that financial institutions may offer to remove defaults in private education loan borrowers’ consumer reports under an approved rehabilitation program.

The Seventh Circuit recently affirmed judgment in favor of the national consumer reporting agencies (“CRAs”), rejecting a plaintiff’s attempt to impose Fair Credit Reporting Act liability upon the CRAs for reporting information the furnisher had verified as accurate.  This case represents a significant victory for CRAs facing collateral attacks of the

On January 28, Thomas W. Thrash, Jr., the Chief Judge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia, issued four decisions on motions to dismiss in cases arising out of the Equifax data breach. Below are a few noteworthy takeaways. 

Factual Background

From mid-May through the end of July 2017, hackers

2018 was a busy year in the consumer financial services world. As we navigate the continuing heavy volume of regulatory change and forthcoming developments from the Trump administration, Troutman Sanders is uniquely positioned to help its clients successfully resolve problems and stay ahead of the compliance curve.  

In this report, we share developments on

On January 16, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan denied a motion to dismiss a plaintiff’s Fair Credit Reporting Act claims on statute of limitations grounds, taking a strict interpretation of the complaint’s allegations as to the plaintiff’s discovery of facts underlying her claims.  A copy of the decision in Blake

Since the Spokeo, Inc. v. Robins decision in 2016, many defendants have worried that a valid standing argument could have the actual impact of leading to more cases being litigated in state court rather than outright dismissals on the merits.  

This month’s ruling in Ratliff v. LTI Trucking Services, Inc. proved to be exactly the