As discussed here, on April 26, the Texas Bankers Association, the American Bankers Association (ABA), and Rio Bank, McAllen, Texas (Rio Bank) filed a complaint in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas challenging the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB or Bureau) final rule under § 1071 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Final Rule). As discussed here, § 1071 amended the Equal Credit Opportunity Act (ECOA) to impose significant data collection and reporting requirements on small business creditors. The plaintiffs’ complaint relied heavily on the Fifth Circuit’s decision in Community Financial Services Association (CFSA) v CFPB, finding the CFPB’s funding structure unconstitutional and, therefore, rules promulgated by the Bureau invalid. The CFPB’s appeal of the Fifth Circuit’s decision is currently pending before the U.S. Supreme Court (discussed here).

On May 26, the plaintiffs moved for a nationwide preliminary injunction against the CFPB’s implementation of its Final Rule. Today, the federal district court issued an order granting, in part, the plaintiffs’ motion. Specifically, the court enjoined the CFPB from implementing and enforcing the Final Rule against the plaintiffs and their members, but denied the plaintiffs’ request for a nationwide injunction. The injunction would dissolve if the U.S. Supreme Court reverses the Fifth Circuit in the CFSA case but, in that event, the CFPB would be required “to extend [the plaintiffs] and their members’ deadlines for compliance with the requirements of the Final Rule to compensate for the period stayed.”

Our Take:

Despite the nationwide injunction being denied by the federal district court, the fact that the court granted the injunction with regard to the ABA’s and Texas Bankers Association’s members, and Rio Bank covers a large number of banks that engage in small business lending for which compliance with the Final Rule is now stayed. Nonetheless, banks that are not members of the ABA or Texas Bankers Association or non-bank small business lenders must continue to comply with the Final Rule.

The U.S. Supreme Court will not hear the pivotal CFSA case until next term, so there will continue to be uncertainty related to the CFPB’s status and its ability to undertake activities like rulemakings, i.e. the Final Rule, until a final decision is issued and the question of whether the Bureau’s funding structure is constitutional is resolved.

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Photo of Christine Emello Christine Emello

Christine focuses her practice on consumer financial services matters, with an emphasis on disputes, litigation, investigations, and examinations. She has worked on both federal and state court cases in jurisdictions across the U.S. Christine drafts pleadings, including complaints, motions, and responses, and prepares…

Christine focuses her practice on consumer financial services matters, with an emphasis on disputes, litigation, investigations, and examinations. She has worked on both federal and state court cases in jurisdictions across the U.S. Christine drafts pleadings, including complaints, motions, and responses, and prepares witnesses for cases involving state and federal laws such as the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA), the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), and the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA). She has worked on cases for a variety of financial institutions, banks, and lenders, including a large multinational bank, a major national health care consulting firm, and a leading worldwide online payments platform.

Photo of Mark Furletti Mark Furletti

Mark helps clients navigate regulatory risks posed by state and federal laws aimed at protecting consumers and small business, particularly in connection with credit, deposit, and payments products. He is a trusted advisor, providing practical legal counsel and advice to providers of financial

Mark helps clients navigate regulatory risks posed by state and federal laws aimed at protecting consumers and small business, particularly in connection with credit, deposit, and payments products. He is a trusted advisor, providing practical legal counsel and advice to providers of financial services across numerous industries.

Photo of Josh McBeain Josh McBeain

Josh focuses his practice on federal and state consumer and business lending and payments laws, including those that apply to credit cards, installment loans, lines of credit, and point-of-sale finance.

Photo of Addison Morgan Addison Morgan

Addison is an associate in the firm’s nationally recognized Consumer Financial Services Practice Group. He has represented several of the nation’s preeminent financial institutions in litigation arising under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA), the Fair Debt…

Addison is an associate in the firm’s nationally recognized Consumer Financial Services Practice Group. He has represented several of the nation’s preeminent financial institutions in litigation arising under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA), the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA), the FTC Holder Rule, and other consumer protection state analogs.

Photo of Caleb Rosenberg Caleb Rosenberg

Caleb is counsel in the firm’s Consumer Financial Services Practice Group. He focuses his practice on helping federal and state-chartered banks, fintech companies, finance companies, and licensed lenders navigate regulatory risks posed by state and federal laws aimed at protecting consumers and small…

Caleb is counsel in the firm’s Consumer Financial Services Practice Group. He focuses his practice on helping federal and state-chartered banks, fintech companies, finance companies, and licensed lenders navigate regulatory risks posed by state and federal laws aimed at protecting consumers and small businesses in the credit and alternative finance products industry.

Photo of Lori Sommerfield Lori Sommerfield

With over two decades of consumer financial services experience in federal government, in-house, and private practice settings, and a specialty in fair lending regulatory compliance, Lori counsels clients in supervisory issues, examinations, investigations, and enforcement actions.

Photo of Chris Willis Chris Willis

Chris is the co-leader of the Consumer Financial Services Regulatory practice at the firm. He advises financial services institutions facing state and federal government investigations and examinations, counseling them on compliance issues including UDAP/UDAAP, credit reporting, debt collection, and fair lending, and defending…

Chris is the co-leader of the Consumer Financial Services Regulatory practice at the firm. He advises financial services institutions facing state and federal government investigations and examinations, counseling them on compliance issues including UDAP/UDAAP, credit reporting, debt collection, and fair lending, and defending them in individual and class action lawsuits brought by consumers and enforcement actions brought by government agencies.

Photo of Joseph Reilly Joseph Reilly

Financial services companies depend on Joe for all aspects of their regulatory and compliance needs. Drawing from two decades of experience in the sector, he provides actionable guidance in a complex and evolving landscape.