Mortgage Lenders & Servicers

Wire fraud cases, arising from what the Federal Bureau of Investigation calls “business email compromise,” are on the rise. In 2018, the FBI reported that business email compromise and other internet-enabled theft, fraud, and exploitation resulted in $2.7 billion of financial loss. See FBI – IC3 Annual Report Released. Surprisingly, even sophisticated parties and

Last year, Sen. Mike Azinger (R-W.Va.) introduced Senate Bill 495 to the West Virginia Legislature, where it was referred to the Judiciary Committee. The bill proposed amendments to the West Virginia Consumer Credit and Protection Act, W. Va. Code § 46A-5-101, which was intended to “bring the Act in conformity with the federal Fair Debt

In a recent decision, the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit affirmed a district court’s ruling that a defendant lender and its property preservation company did not owe the plaintiff homeowner a duty to act to prevent theft or damage to his property. The case is Malick v. JP Morgan Chase Bank

On November 20, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau announced that it is seeking public comments on the TRID Integrated Disclosure Rule, otherwise known as the “TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosure” (“TRID Rule”) in accordance with Section 1022(d) of the Dodd-Frank Act. The TRID Rule implemented the Dodd-Frank Act’s directive to combine certain mortgage disclosures that consumers receive

On September 19, the Stop Debt Collection Abuse Act of 2019 was introduced by Reps. Emanuel Cleaver (D-Mo.) and French Hill (R-Ark.) in the House and Sens. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) and Mike Lee (R-Utah) in the Senate. This is the third iteration of the proposed bill, which was previously introduced in November 2015 and March

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is amending Regulation C under the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA), extending the current temporary threshold for collecting and reporting data about open-end lines of credit until January 1, 2022. The rule also incorporates partial exemptions from the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act

For several years now, New York courts have grappled with the issue of what constitutes revocation of the acceleration of mortgage debt. Because the Appellate Division of New York has four Departments that preside over different counties within the state, the same set of facts has resulted in different outcomes. That may change, however, when

Certified Credit & Collection Bureau (“CCCB”) sent a collection letter to Delia Rodriguez seeking payment of $29.88 for an unpaid medical debt. CCCB’s letter referred to the creditor as its “client” and did not explicitly state that the client was the creditor to whom the debt was owed.

Rodriguez brought a putative class action in

One of the most ambitious (i.e., bad) arguments ever made by a defendant in a TCPA case was rejected by the Western District of New York in Gerrard v. Acara Sol. Inc., 1:18-cv-1041, 2019 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 108038, 2019 WL 2647758 (W.D.N.Y. June 27, 2019). Acara Solutions argued their text messages with

A pro se plaintiff’s lawsuit brought pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act was dismissed by the District of New Jersey for lack of standing in Kraft v. Phelan Hallinan Diamond & Jones, P.C., U.S. Dist. LEXIS 126323 (D. N.J. July 30, 2019). Plaintiff Warren R. Kraft inherited real estate from his deceased